Biology - The Encyclopedia Of Life Project (EOL)

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Biology - The Encyclopedia Of Life Project (EOL)

Post  Skwirlinator on Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:34 am



http://www.eol.org/

The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) is an unprecedented global partnership between the scientific community and the general public. Our goal is to make freely available to anyone knowledge about all the world’s organisms. Anybody can register as an EOL member and add text, images, videos, comments or tags to EOL pages. Expert curators ensure quality of the core collection by authenticating materials submitted by diverse projects and individual contributors. Together we can make EOL the best, most comprehensive source for biodiversity information.

A couple of things to note:

* We are committed to building an open access collection, with as few restrictions on re-use as possible. Therefore all information you share with EOL must also be shared with the rest of the world under a creative commons license that allows the creation of derivative works, at least for non-commercial purposes. See our Licensing Policy.
* We are committed to clearly crediting the sources of the information we serve and urge our visitors to cite and visit the original sources.

The Encyclopedia will be an online reference and database on all 1.9 million species currently known to science and will stay current by capturing information on newly discovered and formally described species. The Encyclopedia of Life will help all of us better understand life on our planet.

EOL’s initial release of species sites in February 2008 includes individualized pages for more than 1,000,000 species of plants, animals, and microorganisms. Only subsets of these pages, however, are comprehensive in terms of content.

There are four kinds of pages in the initial release:

* About 25 exemplar species pages contain a wide array of information. These pages offer a glimpse into how rich EOL will become. Exemplar pages have been authenticated (endorsed) by scientists who are experts on these species.
* Tens of thousands of additional species pages are available, focusing on a small number of taxonomic groups for which EOL has developed partnerships with stewards of publicly available information. These pages are also authenticated by scientists, but they do not yet contain the rich array of information found on the exemplar pages.
* About one million minimal species pages contain limited content—in most cases, just the species’ scientific and common names, limited information about its taxonomic position and distribution, and links to other sources of information. These minimal species pages are, in effect, placeholders for richer pages that will be added as EOL recruits taxonomic specialists to validate and edit content, establishes formal agreements with additional data partners that can provide relevant content, and generates additional content via the Biodiversity Heritage Library, other Web-based resources, and contributions from individual scientists and citizen-scientists.
* Finally, thousands of linking pages represent higher levels of classification (genus, family, etc.). These pages help users traverse the taxonomic hierarchy. For example, a user trying to identify a picture of an organism she photographed on a snorkeling trip might start at Chordates, then go to Cartilaginous Fishes, then to Rays, and so on, until finally reaching the species page for the Giant Manta.

At the same time as EOL species pages are released, other important EOL activities are proceeding behind the scenes. The Biodiversity Heritage Library has already digitized more than 2 million pages of the professional taxonomic literature, much of which is available for free from the BHL website. Eventually, BHL hopes to process up to 30 million pages. The Education and Outreach (E&O) working group is developing educational and citizen-science activities to be released next year that incorporate EOL species pages. Finally, the Biodiversity Synthesis Center has recently released a Request for Proposals for workshops to advance biodiversity-related research and application.

# Animalia +

* Chordata +
o Mammalia +
+ Primates +
# Hominidae +
* not allowed +
o not allowed sapiens Linnaeus, 1758

Human beings, humans, or not allowed sapiens sapiens (not allowed sapiens is latin and refers to the wise or knowing human) are bipedal primates in the family Hominidae. DNA evidence indicates that modern humans originated in Africa about 250,000 years ago. Humans have a highly developed brain, capable of abstract reasoning, language, introspection, and emotion. This mental capability, combined with an erect body carriage that frees the forelimbs (arms) for manipulating objects, has allowed humans to make far greater use of tools than any other species. Humans currently inhabit every continent on Earth, except Antarctica (although several governments maintain seasonally-staffed research stations there). Humans also now have a continuous presence in low Earth orbit, occupying the International Space Station. The human population on Earth is greater than 6.7 billion, as of July, 2008.

Here is our page
http://www.eol.org/pages/327955

Have fun!
avatar
Skwirlinator

Posts : 87
Join date : 2010-09-19
Age : 56
Location : misery

View user profile http://z10.invisionfree.com/SF_Explorers/index.php?

Back to top Go down

Re: Biology - The Encyclopedia Of Life Project (EOL)

Post  Skwirlinator on Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:40 am

It might be fun to Sign up your school as an Editor for this project. Might be a fun ongoing project to explore Biology and Life Sciences. Be sure you get permission from all the appropriate school authorities before committing your school information. I have a personal account with them and you can too.
avatar
Skwirlinator

Posts : 87
Join date : 2010-09-19
Age : 56
Location : misery

View user profile http://z10.invisionfree.com/SF_Explorers/index.php?

Back to top Go down

Re: Biology - The Encyclopedia Of Life Project (EOL)

Post  Skwirlinator on Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:42 am

For Educators
Why educators are important to us

We share your passion for science as a way of knowing, and learning as a lifelong enterprise. As you foster students’ natural curiosity through observation and experimentation, you provide them with powerful tools for understanding the living world.The EOL Learning + Education Group, in partnership with educators in both formal and informal settings, seeks to transform how students learn about biodiversity by providing easy access to authoritative content and by encouraging them to participate in building the Encyclopedia of Life. By expanding and deepening our collective understanding of our fellow species, EOL offers a unique opportunity to create a global community of learners with enormous potential to inspire future generations of scientists and stewards of our living planet.
Why the Encyclopedia of Life needs you

The Encyclopedia of Life offers a unique opportunity to empower educators and students in the adventure of learning by providing reliable and comprehensive information about global biodiversity and by involving learners in scientific experimentation and exploration.But to make EOL the best education resource and experience it can be, we need your help. By sharing your experiences in our Discussion Forums and taking our surveys, you can help us make EOL more useful and engaging in your own learning environment whether it’s a schoolroom, an exhibit hall, or a “classroom without walls”. We encourage the participation and insights from educators and learners wherever they may be around the globe. We welcome your energy, experience, and insights in making the Learning & Education site the best possible gateway to EOL.org and in building and improving the Encyclopedia of Life itself.

http://education.eol.org/educators

For Students
Learning with science

Science isn’t a series of facts to be memorized—the scientific method is one of the great human inventions, a powerful tool for understanding the processes at work in our natural world, from atoms to cells, from starfish to stars. Like life itself, biology is ever-evolving, changing and growing as scientists continue to ask questions, make new discoveries, and revise their theories and as new tools and methodologies are developed that allow new exploration and analysis.

Rather than just learning about science, we believe students of all ages, in or out of a classroom, can learn with science, by sharpening their skills as observers and critical thinkers, and working with scientists on citizen science projects in their own neighborhoods.
Learning with the Encyclopedia of Life

In addition to being an authoritative resource for species information, EOL species pages are also places where anyone can interact, participate and contribute. Adding text and images for your favorite organisms might be a good first step. Visit our Getting Started page to learn how to add text, comments, and tags, and upload images and video through Flickr. Later you’ll be able to use LifeDesks to submit information, observations, and stories.

Feel free to register and take part in our Discussion Forum and talk to your teacher about class projects that might involve EOL. Or contact us here.

http://education.eol.org/students
avatar
Skwirlinator

Posts : 87
Join date : 2010-09-19
Age : 56
Location : misery

View user profile http://z10.invisionfree.com/SF_Explorers/index.php?

Back to top Go down

Re: Biology - The Encyclopedia Of Life Project (EOL)

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum