The Autumnal Equinox - Where Were You?

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The Autumnal Equinox - Where Were You?

Post  Skwirlinator on Mon Sep 20, 2010 12:19 pm



http://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/september-equinox.html

The September equinox occurs at 03:09 (or 3:09am) Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) on September 23, 2010. It is also referred to as the autumnal or fall equinox in the northern hemisphere, as well as the spring or vernal equinox in the southern hemisphere (not to be confused with the March equinox). This is due to the seasonal contrasts between both hemispheres throughout the year.

Dispelling the “exactly 12 hours of daylight” myth

During the equinox, the length of night and day across the world is nearly, but not entirely, equal. This is because the day is slightly longer in places that are further away from the equator, and because the sun takes longer to rise and set in these locations. Furthermore, the sun takes longer to rise and set farther from the equator because it does not set straight down - it moves in a horizontal direction.

Historical Fact

A Greek astronomer and mathematician named Hipparchus (ca. 190-ca.120 BCE) was attributed by various sources to have discovered the precession of the equinoxes, the slow movement among the stars of the two opposite places where the sun crosses the celestial equator. However, the difference between the sidereal and tropical years (the precession equivalent) was known to Aristarchus of Samos (around 280 BCE) prior to this.

Hipparchus made observations of the equinox and solstice. Astronomers use the spring equinoctial point to define their frame of reference, and the movement of this point implies that the measured position of a star varies with the date of measurement. Hipparchus also compiled a star catalogue, but this has been lost.

The word “equinox” derives from the Latin words meaning “equal night” and refers to the time when the sun crosses the equator. In modern times this word is used to refer not only to the positions on the ecliptic but also the times of the year when the sun has reached them. The September equinox has been used as a reference point in many calendars in the past, including the French Revolutionary Calendar. Although very little is known about the ancient Macedonian calendar, some believe that the first month began after the autumnal equinox.

So where were you?
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Re: The Autumnal Equinox - Where Were You?

Post  Vana on Mon Sep 20, 2010 12:43 pm

Skwirlinator wrote:

http://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/september-equinox.html

The September equinox occurs at 03:09 (or 3:09am) Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) on September 23, 2010. It is also referred to as the autumnal or fall equinox in the northern hemisphere, as well as the spring or vernal equinox in the southern hemisphere (not to be confused with the March equinox). This is due to the seasonal contrasts between both hemispheres throughout the year.

Dispelling the “exactly 12 hours of daylight” myth

During the equinox, the length of night and day across the world is nearly, but not entirely, equal. This is because the day is slightly longer in places that are further away from the equator, and because the sun takes longer to rise and set in these locations. Furthermore, the sun takes longer to rise and set farther from the equator because it does not set straight down - it moves in a horizontal direction.

Historical Fact

A Greek astronomer and mathematician named Hipparchus (ca. 190-ca.120 BCE) was attributed by various sources to have discovered the precession of the equinoxes, the slow movement among the stars of the two opposite places where the sun crosses the celestial equator. However, the difference between the sidereal and tropical years (the precession equivalent) was known to Aristarchus of Samos (around 280 BCE) prior to this.

Hipparchus made observations of the equinox and solstice. Astronomers use the spring equinoctial point to define their frame of reference, and the movement of this point implies that the measured position of a star varies with the date of measurement. Hipparchus also compiled a star catalogue, but this has been lost.

The word “equinox” derives from the Latin words meaning “equal night” and refers to the time when the sun crosses the equator. In modern times this word is used to refer not only to the positions on the ecliptic but also the times of the year when the sun has reached them. The September equinox has been used as a reference point in many calendars in the past, including the French Revolutionary Calendar. Although very little is known about the ancient Macedonian calendar, some believe that the first month began after the autumnal equinox.

So where were you?


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Re: The Autumnal Equinox - Where Were You?

Post  Skwirlinator on Mon Sep 20, 2010 1:05 pm

LOL, ok-you asked for it! Twisted Evil

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In My Mind, in my body, in my computer chair, in my activities room, in my house, in Bonne Terre, in Missouri, in the Untited States of America, on the North American Continent, on the North Western Hemisphere of Planet Earth, in the Sol Star System in the Orion Arm of the Milky Way Galaxy, in the Local Group, in the Virgo Supercluster in the Known Universe.
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Re: The Autumnal Equinox - Where Were You?

Post  Vana on Mon Sep 20, 2010 1:07 pm

xD lol nice
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